Iron Physical Therapy at Midland Park Crossfit Bison Competition

Iron Physical Therapy at Midland Park Crossfit Bison Competition

This month, we attended the second annual Bison Classic Crossfit Competition in Midland Park, New Jersey - where we will be opening our second location this summer! These impressive athletes showed how strength and recovery go hand-in-hand after being treated with Active Release Technique, Kinesio Taping, and Normatec Recovery Boots!

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Feel Good (and look cool) with Kinesio Tape!

You may have noticed world class athletes sporting various colors of tape on ankles, legs, shoulders and more! This is Kinesio Tape working its magic for the best of the best!

Fortunately, Kinesio Tape is also available to help those of us who are just trying to buckle a seatbelt or take a walk without wincing in pain.

What's Kinesio Tape?

  • The tape has a texture similar to that of living human tissue and the elasticity is comparable to that of a muscle.

  • The taping facilitates natural healing while providing support and stability to muscles and joints without restricting the range of motion.

The Many Uses of Kinesio Tape

Kinesio tape has an abundance of positive effects:

  • Re-educate the neuromuscular system

  • Reduce pain and inflammation

  • Relax fatigued overworked muscles

  • Optimize performance

  • Prevent injury

  • Promote improved circulation and healing

Kinesio can be used from head-to- toe to improve the following conditions:

  • carpal tunnel syndrome

  • lower back strain/pain

  • shoulder/knee conditions

  • muscular facilitation or inhibition

  • groin injury

  • whiplash

  • tennis elbow

  • plantar fasciitis

  • pre and post surgical edema

  • ankle sprains

  • nipple burn - not exactly protocol, but works great for men during a run

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Who Can Use It?

Utilizing Kinesio Tape takes more than meets the eye. Certification is necessary so practitioners, including Dr. Mayes, have had hands-on training, education, and assessment.

You can buy precut tape to apply yourself, but I would use extreme caution. For instance, you might have knee pain so you apply tape there, but the problem is actually originating in your hip. It's important to have a proper evaluation and diagnosis from a medical professional before beginning any type of treatment. It also takes quite a bit of skill to effectively apply the tape.

To learn more about Kinesio Tape, I encourage you to visit their website.

Personal Testimony

This worldwide phenomenon has definitely made it's mark in our office. Here's what two staff members have to say:

"Dr. Mayes used Kinesio during treatment for my shoulder.  In my vanity, I removed the black tape before heading to a party in a strapless dress and suffered the next day!  I will forever be a fan!" - Melissa Jenkins, Manager

"I've had tape on everything from my foot to my knee and shoulder. It gave me bit of relief for each condition, but I really became an evangelist after being taped during an episode of severe neck pain. It was simple the ONLY thing that gave me relief, functionality, and sleep." - Meri Mayes, Owner IronPT

Have you had Kinesio Tape?

Do you love it as much as we do?

Time for a Tune Up! Why Athletes Need a Good "Mechanic"

Our cars require periodic preventative maintenance (oil change, tire rotation, fluids flushed, etc.) to run optimally. When we neglect to do this simple vehicle upkeep, we pay for it...and it's usually not cheap. So just like our cars, we too require preventative maintenance. If you're very active, then you'll likely need even more frequent maintenance, similar to a car driven 100 miles/day versus 2 miles. OR if you're an older model, then you might also need a bit more TLC.

So where am I going with this? I'm encouraging you to find a trusted "Mechanic" to take care of YOU, just like you have for your car.

So who should it be? As a Doctor of Physical Therapy, I'm responsible for being the "mechanic" who diagnoses and treats musculoskeletal problems  (muscles, bones, tendons, ligaments, etc).  When it comes to overuse/repetitive sports injuries, it's especially important to find a PT who has expertise in soft tissue treatment. I'm a strong believer inActive Release Technique (ART), Grastonand Kinesiotaping. You can find you're local provider by searching the above websites.

So when should you see someone? I encourage my patients, especially athletes, to come in for a few sessions if they have nagging discomfort that goes on longer than a week. Early intervention with hands-on treatment and corrective exercise can prevent being sidelined. Many of you are good with stretching, foam rolling and cross training, but may need a few joint mobilizations and tweaks to your program to get out of pain.

So why don't people, especially athletes, do maintenance? Athletes are extremely STUBBORN and like to ignore pain/discomfort. If you don't know the difference between"good" pain and "bad" pain, you'll want to speak with your local physical therapist. My patients can always call or email me to check in about something that has started to bother them.

When I feel a twinge, I often do preventative maintenance (taping, Graston, ART, etc.) to keep things at bay. A quick 30-minute treatment is much easier than running 20 miles in pain (or worse, not at all)

People also avoid seeing their PT because they think a prescription is needed. In most states (including NJ), you do not need any type of referral. You can just come in and see someone for a few visits and often your insurance will cover the cost or you can just pay cash.

So treat your body BETTER than your car! You can't just go out and buy a new one.

Train hard, train smart!

IRON PT WOD: 10/22/2012

  • 9 mi; 1hr 16 mins; avg. pace: 8'34"; 1058 calories

IRON PT WOD: 10/21/2012

  • Cross training: 15 miles on my bike trainer while watching the NY Giants beat the Redskins!

IRON PT WOD: 10/20/2012

  • 13.51 mi; 1hr 52 mins; avg. pace 8'27"; 1623 calories

IRON PT WOD: 10/17/2012

  • 6.39 mi; 52'18"; avg. pace 8'20"; 776 calories

IRON PT WOD: 10/15/2012

  • 2.57 mi; 21'26"; avg. pace 8'27"; 311 calories